SCImago Journal & Country Rank
                         

  

BAILES CHINOS AND THEIR INVISIBLE IDENTITY IN CENTRAL CHILE

BAILES CHINOS Y SU IDENTIDAD INVISIBLE EN CHILE CENTRAL

José Pérez de Arce A.

The bailes chinos ritual groups from Aconcagua Valley (Chile) are studied from a sonorous perspective in relation to the complex identity elements they present. It is possible to identify sound elements corresponding to an indigenous heritage, along with Catholic and Chilean elements expressed through visual and poetic media. Certain social strata, as shown in the literature, ignore the sound expression but not the visual and poetic expressions. This perceptual asymmetry permits us to understand why certain pre-Hispanic elements remained in a geographical place where the memory of indigenous past has been erased, and where the global society exerts great pressure. It is suggested that sound acts as an identity tool operating in relatively exclusive channels, and is invisible to the social strata that has opposed the indigenous expression during the last 500 years.

Continue Reading - PDF

Print Email

NOW IT IS PACHALLAMPE! SYMBOLISM, CELEBRATION AND MEMORY IN THE PLANTING OF POTATO IN SOCOROMA, NORTH OF CHILE

¡AHORA SÍ QUE ES PACHALLAMPE! SIMBOLISMO, TECNOLOGÍA Y MEMORIA EN LA SIEMBRA DE PAPA EN SOCOROMA, NORTE DE CHILE

Persis B. Clarkson, Calogero M. Santoro, Thomas E. Levy, Lautaro Núñez, Axel Nielsen, Steven Rosen, Frank Förster, José M. Capriles, Anatoly M. Khazanov, Michael Frachetti, Daniela Valenzuela, Carlos Choque Mariño and Alberto Díaz Araya

This article shows the ritual practices, meanings and memories expressed in the celebration of the Pachallampe in Socoroma. This, in order to identify and understand the rituals and symbolism deployed by stewards and indigenous community members during the sowing of potato. For this purpose, we have studied the importance of performance, memory, dance and the dramatizations, carrying out a descriptive and interpretative analysis of the celebration, identifying the meanings, associations, identities and cultural appropriations of the Socoromeños, derived from the Hispano-indigenous interactions and their relationship to the antinomic forces of their sacred space.

Continue Reading - PDF

Print Email

CARICATURES OF BLACK PERU IN CHILEAN MAGAZINES. ICONOGRAPHIC REFERENTS AND OTHERNESS (1902-1932)

CARICATURAS DEL PERÚ NEGRO EN MAGAZINES CHILENOS. REFERENTES ICONOGRÁFICOS Y ALTERIDAD (1902-1932)

Rodrigo Ruz Zagal, Luis Galdames Rosas, Michel Meza Aliaga and Alberto Díaz Araya.

The article discusses the ways in which the Peruvian population was represented through its caricaturing in illustrated magazines (Sucesos and Corre-Vuela, published by Zig-Zag Publishing House) circulating in the Chilean metropolitan area during the first three decades of the twentieth century. The link of the caricature with the black race is explored, searching for the iconographic references that shape it, suggesting the use of a stereotypical archetype regarding Blackness created in the slavery context in the US and replicated in the Chilean media. It is argued that these images would have been anchored to a specific negative meaning to represent “the Peruvian” in the context of the geopolitical, diplomatic, and cultural tension with Peru, derived from the War of the Pacific.

Continue Reading - PDF

Print Email

CHENQUES IN CENTRAL WESTERN PATAGONIA (FINAL LATE HOLOCENE, ÑIREHUAO VALLEY, 45° S, CHILE)

CHENQUES EN EL CENTRO OESTE DE PATAGONIA (HOLOCENO TARDÍO FINAL, VALLE DE ÑIREHUAO, 45° S, CHILE)

César Méndez, Omar Reyes, Amalia Nuevo Delaunay and Elvira Latorre.

The chenque funerary-type concentrates in the last millennium in the southernmost area of the Southern Cone of South America. Efforts for understanding this funerary type, its spatio-temporal distribution, and the potential of its bioanthropological information are conditioned by the partial spatial sampling, preservation of bone material, and illegal collecting. This paper presents novel information from four chenques of the Andean valley of Ñirehuao (Chile) in central Patagonia. We sought to record the maximum potential of these contexts, even when the remains were recorded in incomplete state. This paper summarizes contextual aspects of the funerary type, describes the bioanthropological characteristics of the individuals, and presents the radiocarbon dates and the stable isotopes values on bone for each of the identified individuals, as well as the results of the elemental analysis of the metallic material associated with one of them. From this, we confirm a maximum age of 1510 cal years BP. for the chenques close to the Andes of Central Patagonia, show isotopic patterns consistent with broad spectrum protein diets and reveal the presence of exotic materials suggestive of a wide-ranging transfer of goods during the 12 and 13th Centuries.

Continue Reading - PDF

Print Email

HUMAN SETTLEMENTS AROUND THE WETLANDS OF VALDIVIA CITY FROM PRE HISPANIC TO COLONIAL TIMES

ASENTAMIENTOS HUMANOS EN TORNO A LOS HUMEDALES DE LA CIUDAD DE VALDIVIA EN TIEMPOS PREHISPÁNICOS E HISTÓRICOS COLONIALES

Leonor Adán Alfaro, Simón Urbina Araya and Margarita Alvarado Pérez

Caravans are historically specific and can be found in arid lands and mountains of different parts of the world, sharing characteristics such as domesticated animals with specific morphologies and behavioural traits which impose distinctive constraints on human action; patterns of mobility associated with specialized foraging and pastoralist societies; efficient trail routes; reliance upon oases and stations that served as points of trade, exchange and caravan provisioning; representations (“art”); structures and landmarks near and/or related to caravan trails; and the rapid disappearance of these resources through modern development and destruction. Globally, there is great variability as well as similarity in caravan development, use, and structure. Organized caravans seem to have appeared as a result of complex international economies, polities, social and religious networks, and we have good archaeological, historic and ethnographic data brought to light in recent decades that has improved our understanding of the organization and use of ancient caravans worldwide, and their changes through time.

Continue Reading - PDF

Print Email